Mid-Year Check In | 2020

Hi, folks!

I saw this meme/ tag on Eric‘s channel, and decided to jump in and take the opportunity to discuss my reading year so far. Here are the questions/ prompts:

1. How many books have you read so far this year?

69 books, comprising a total of 15.875 pages. (If you are curious about how my reading spreadsheet works, I made a video about it. You can download the spreadsheet here, and read the corresponding blog notes here.)

Month Number of books Average of Pages Min of Pages Max of Pages Sum of Pages Percentage
jan 13 242,1 72 528 3147 18,84%
fev 11 190,9 38 306 2100 15,94%
mar 10 187,9 19 304 1879 14,49%
abr 10 258,1 122 432 2581 14,49%
mai 13 269,6 114 480 3505 18,84%
jun 10 241,0 120 432 2410 14,49%
jul 2 126,5 123 130 253 2,90%
Total 69 230,1 19 528 15875

63,77% of the books were four-star, and 23,19% were five-star reads. 13,04% of my reads were just ok (three stars), and I did not have any two or one star reads so far this year.

Publishing Year Number of books Percentage
<1900 4 5,80%
1900-1909 3 4,35%
1920-1929 4 5,80%
1930-1939 5 7,25%
1940-1949 8 11,59%
1950-1959 2 2,90%
1960-1969 1 1,45%
1970-1979 7 10,14%
1980-1989 3 4,35%
1990-1999 8 11,59%
2000-2009 6 8,70%
2010-2019 14 20,29%
2020-2029 4 5,80%

 


Book Lenght Number of books Percentage
<100 4 5,80%
100-199 25 36,23%
200-299 26 37,68%
300-399 8 11,59%
400-499 5 7,25%
500-599 1 1,45%

 


Source Number of books Percentage
Library 21 30,43%
TBR 48 69,57%

 


Format Number of books Percentage
Audio 10 14%
Ebook 19 28%
Hardback 12 17%
Paperback 28 41%

 


Author Nationality Number of Books Percentage
Europe 38 55,1%
North America 21 30,4%
Oceania 1 1,4%
South-America 9 13,0%

 


Gender Number of books Percentage
Female 58 84,06%
Male 8 11,59%
Both 2 2,90%
Non-binary 1 1,45%

 


Finally, the authors I read the most in 2020 were Maria Benedia Bormann (3), Virginia Woolf (3), Anna Seghers (2), Zora Neale Hurston (2), and Karin Boye (2).


2. What’s your favourite book so far this year?

The Seventh Cross, by Anna Seghers (2018, tr. Margot Bettauer Dembo. Original: Das siebte Kreuz, 1942) & The Age of Innocence, by Edith Wharton (1920)

 


3. What’s the most disappointing book you’ve read this year?

Paris Red by Maureen Gibbon (2014) & My Autobiography of Carson McCullers, by Jenn Shapland (2020)

 


4. What genre have you read most this year?

Literary fiction novels.

Genre Number of books Percentage
Non-fiction 25 36,23%
 – Biography 8 11,59%
 – Diary 2 2,90%
 – Essay 8 11,59%
 – Literary Criticism 4 5,80%
 – Memoir 2 2,90%
 – Literary journalism 1 1,45%
Novel 32 46,38%
 – Classic 11 15,94%
 – Historical Fiction 1 1,45%
 – Literary Fiction 19 27,54%
 – Dystopia 1 1,45%
 Play 1 1,45%
Poetry 5 7,25%
Short-stories 2 2,90%
Novella 4 5,80%
 – Classic 1 1,45%
 – Literary Fiction 3 4,35%

 


5. Name a new favourite author that you’ve discovered this year.

Gayl Jones & Gamel Woolsey

 


6. What’s the most surprisingly good book you’ve read so far this year?

Comemadre, by Roque Larraquy (2018, tr. Heather Cleary. Original: La comemadre, 2010) & Die, My Love, by Ariana Harwicz (2017, tr. Sarah Moses & Carolina Orloff. Original: Matate, Amor, 2012)


7. What are your favourite and most anticipated 2020 releases?
  • Summerwater, by Sarah Moss
  • Summer, by Ali Smith
  • To Be A Man: Stories, by Nicole Krauss
  • Daddy, by Emma Cline
  • The Liar’s Dictionary, by Eley Williams
  • The Mission House, by Carys Davies
  • A Lover’s Discourse, by Xiaolu Guo
  • Dearly: New Poems, by Margaret Atwood
  • Death in Her Hands, by Ottessa Moshfegh
  • Jack, by Marilynne Robinson
  • The Pull of the Stars, by Emma Donoghue
  • Sisters, by Daisy Johnson
  • Intimations: Six Essays, by Zadie Smith

8. What’s your next big priority for your reading?

Funny Weather: Art in an Emergency, by Olivia Laing (2020) & The Bass Rock, by Evie Wyld (2020)


 

9. What’s been your bookish highlight of the year so far?

10. Who do you tag?

Everyone who enjoyed reading this post 🙂

Yours truly,

J.


A Woman Reading by Ulisse Caputo

8 thoughts on “Mid-Year Check In | 2020

  1. This is fascinating. Do you deliberately plan your reading to be so evenly spread out across the decades, or did it just work out that way? And where is the dividing line between classics and literary fiction?

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    1. I hadn’t noticed it was so evenly spread, actually. In previous years, it has not been this way, so perhaps it is just a phase… My dividing line is highly subjective: literary classics tend to correspond to more contemporary books, while classics are the books published until the early 20th century.

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