Sarah Orne Jewett

Sarah Orne Jewett (born Theodora Sarah Orne Jewett, September 3, 1849 – June 24, 1909) was an American writer.

She studied at Berwick Academy, Maine, and started her writing career in the late 1860’s, publishing short stories in the Atlantic Monthly. Jewett was a close friend of the American writer Annie Adams Fields and of the French author Thérèse Bentzon (nom de plume of Marie Thérèse Blanc). After the death of Annie Fields’s husband, in 1881, she and Sarah lived together for the rest of Jewett’s life. Sarah was also a mentor and friend of Willa Cather, who, in turn, was a great admirer of her work: “If I were asked to name three American books which have the possibility of a long, long, life, I should say at once: The Scarlett Letter, Huckleberry Finn, and The Country of the Pointed Firs”, wrote Cather in 1925. Henry James called The Country of the Pointed Firsa beautiful little quantum of achievement.”

Sarah died in 1909, after suffering a stroke.

Books

  • Deephaven, 1877
  • Play Days, 1878
  • Old Friends and New, 1879
  • Country By-Ways, 1881
  • A Country Doctor, 1884
  • The Mate of the Daylight, and Friends Ashore, 1884
  • A Marsh Island, 1884
  • A White Heron and Other Stories, 1886
  • The Story of the Normans, Told Chiefly in Relation to Their Conquest of England, 1887
  • The King of Folly Island and Other People, 1888
  • Tales of New England, 1890
  • Betty Leicester: A Story for Girls, 1890
  • Strangers and Wayfarers, 1890
  • A Native of Winby and Other Tales, 1893
  • Betty Leicester’s English Christmas: A New Chapter of an Old Story, 1894
  • The Life of Nancy, 1895
  • The Country of the Pointed Firs, 1896
  • The Queen’s Twin and Other Stories, 1899
  • The Tory Lover, 1901
  • An Empty Purse: A Christmas Story, 1905
  • Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett, edited by Annie Adams Fields, 1911

About her

  • Sarah Orne Jewett: Her World and Her Work. by Paula Blanchard, 1994
  • Sarah Orne Jewett, an American Persephone, by Sarah W. Sherman, 1989

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