Richard Yates

Richard Yates (February 3, 1926 – November 7, 1992) was an American writer.

He attended Avon Old Farms School in Avon, Connecticut, and later joined the Army, serving in France and Germany during World War II. In 1946, Yates returned to New York, where he worked as a journalist and publicity writer. After starting his career as a novelist in 1961, he lectured at Columbia University, the New School for Social Research, Boston University, among other institutions.

Yates died of emphysema in 1992.

Awards

  • Finalist for the National Book Award (1961) for Revolutionary Road

Books

  • Revolutionary Road (1961)
  • Eleven Kinds of Loneliness (1962) (stories)
  • A Special Providence (1969)
  • Disturbing the Peace (1975)
  • The Easter Parade (1976)
  • A Good School (1978)
  • Liars in Love (1981) (stories)
  • Young Hearts Crying (1984)
  • Cold Spring Harbor (1986)
  • The Collected Stories of Richard Yates (2001)

About him

  • A Tragic Honesty: The Life and Work of Richard Yates, by Blake Bailey (2003)
  • Dismembering the American Dream: the Life and Fiction of Richard Yates, by Kate Charlton-Jones (2014)
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2 Comments

  1. Great post! I am a huge fan of Yates, and that because of one book – Revolutionary Road, one of the greatest debut novels of all times. I can’t remember the number of times I cried upon finishing it. It is so masterful and emotional. A definite heart-breaker.

    Like

    Reply

    1. Thank you, Diana! Revolutionary Road is one of my favourite novels of all time, and The Easter Parade was one of the best books I read in 2018 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

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