Migrating from one waiting room to another

“Human rights Having faith is lazy and coward. Lazy for assuming a story to be true without wanting to test it. Coward because one discards the doubt that is inherent to curiosity”, says Richard Dawkins, in an interview with Martijn van Calmthout in last Saturday’s Volkskrant. Laziness and cowardice should be basic human rights. True…

Arnon Grunberg

Arnon Grunberg (February 22, 1971) is a Dutch writer. He was born in Amsterdam to Jewish parents who emigrated from Germany after the war. When he was 17 years old, Arnon dropped out of high school, and, after a failed acting career, he made his writing debut at 24 years old with “Blue Mondays”. He…

Flesh is a function of enchantment

Dear Angela, While reading your novel The Passion of New Eve (1977), I could not stop thinking to myself: this must be how it feels to go through a reverse out-of-body experience. My mind is there with you, catching the references, the twisted sense of humour, the symbolic spins, the sharp satire, and all that;…

Angela Carter

Angela Olive Carter-Pearce (née Stalker, 7 May 1940 – 16 February 1992) was an English writer. She studied English literature at the University of Bristol, worked as journalist, and was writer in residence at the University of Sheffield, Brown University, the University of Adelaide, and the University of East Anglia. She died of lung cancer in 1992. Awards 1984 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for…

My book journal | 2018

Hi, folks! I asked you over at Instagram if you would be interested in having a peek at my book journal. I’ve been trying my hand at keeping a TBR journal since April, and it’s been fun. Since most of you seemed to be curious, here is a brief flip-through: Notes: Inspiration: Sarah @ Bookmarked: https://youtu.be/INd8IMsvao8…

20 Books of Summer | 2018

Hello, lovelies, I have recently come back from a bike trip along the Via Julia, a route following the Roman road from Günzburg to Salzburg. The weather was warm, blue-skied and sunny, and Summer was impatiently making its way around us.  In my inner literary calender, this means another thing: it’s time for another 20 Books…

Taking apart mythologies

If we all put our queer shoulders to the wheel “Are you conscious of directing the reader to think in a certain way when you write? It’s very tricky because people are different and people have different responses to fiction. But it’s impossible to direct and I think it wouldn’t be a good thing if…

What’s in a name (and on a bookshelf?) | My blog’s name in books

Hello, folks, I saw this meme doing the rounds at Karen, Lizzy, Simon, Ali & Jane, and decided to join in! The meme was created by  Fictionophile and it is as simple as it gets: spell out your blog’s name from books on your TBR shelf. I’ve perused my shelf of Virago unread books, and here is what I found: THE Treasure…

The tempting fruit that hung above you

Shards I can never remake the thing I have destroyed; I brushed the golden dust from the moth’s bright wing, I called down wind to shatter the cherry-blossoms, I did a terrible thing. I feared that the cup might fall, so I flung it from me; I feared that the bird might fly, so I…

Aline Murray Kilmer

Aline Murray Kilmer (August 1, 1888 – October 1, 1941) was an American poet and essayist. She attended the Rutgers College Grammar School in New Brunswick, New Jersey, and graduated from the Vail-Deane School in Elizabeth, New Jersey. After her husband’s death in World War I, she began publishing her own books. Books Poetry Candles That Burn (1919) Vigils (1921) Shards (poem) To Sappho, About Her Apple (poem)…

Library Loot & Bout of Books

Hey, folks, Whenever I go to the library, I cannot resist coming back home with a stack. Here is my Library Loot: May 9 to 15 Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief, encouraging bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. I seem to…

That indefinitely extended requirement that one human being makes upon another

Dear Iris, “I think it’s terrible to be in danger of writing a philosophical novel”, you said in an interview. And I know you have systematically refused to be called a philosophical novelist. However, may I politely disagree? Anatole Broyard attributes to you the idea that good art is philosophy swimming, or philosophy drowning. I could not trace…

Iris Murdoch

Iris Murdoch (Jean Iris Murdoch, 15 July 1919 – 8 February 1999) was an  Anglo-Irish novelist and philosopher. Murdoch studied classics at Somerville College, Oxford. She was awarded a first-class honours degree in 1942. She went into the civil service and was assistant principal in the Treasury from 1942 to 1944. From 1944 to 1946, she worked with refugees…