Rose Macaulay

Emilie Rose Macaulay (1 August 1881 – 30 October 1958) was an English writer.

She studied at Oxford High School for Girls and at Somerville College at Oxford University. During World War I, Rose worked in the British Propaganda Department, then as a nurse, and later as a civil servant in the War Office.

She had an affair with the writer Gerald O’Donovan, and her books were influenced by Virginia Woolf and Anatole France. She was created a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire on 31 December 1957.

Books

Fiction:

  • Abbots Verney (1906)
  • The Furnace (1907)
  • The Secret River (1909)
  • The Valley Captives (1911)
  • Views and Vagabonds (1912)
  • The Lee Shore (1913)
  • The Two Blind Countries (1914) Poetry.
  • The Making of a Bigot (c 1914)
  • Non-Combatants and Others (1916)
  • What Not: A Prophetic Comedy (1918)
  • Three Days (1919) Poetry.
  • Potterism (1920)
  • Dangerous Ages (1921)
  • Mystery At Geneva: An Improbable Tale of Singular Happenings (1922)
  • Told by an Idiot (1923)
  • Orphan Island (1924)
  • Crewe Train (1926)
  • Keeping Up Appearances (1928)
  • Misfortunes, poems by Rose Macaulay with engravings by Stanley Morison (1930)
  • Staying with Relations (1930)
  • They Were Defeated (1932)
  • Going Abroad (1934)
  • I Would Be Private (1937)
  • And No Man’s Wit (1940)
  • The World My Wilderness (1950)
  • The Towers of Trebizond (1956)

Non-Fiction:

  • A Casual Commentary (1925)
  • Some Religious Elements in English Literature (1931)
  • Milton (1934)
  • Personal Pleasures (1935)
  • The Minor Pleasures of Life (1936)
  • An Open Letter (1937)
  • The Writings of E.M. Forster (1938)
  • Life Among the English (1942)
  • Southey in Portugal (1945)
  • They Went to Portugal (1946)
  • Evelyn Waugh (1946)
  • Fabled Shore: From the Pyrenees to Portugal By Road (1949)
  • Pleasure of Ruins (1953)
  • Coming to London (1957)
  • Letters to a Friend 1950–52 (1961)
  • Last letters to a friend 1952–1958 (1962)
  • Letters to a Sister (1964)
  • They Went to Portugal Too (1990) (The second part of They Went to Portugal, which had not been published with the 1946 edition, because of paper restrictions.)
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2 Comments Add yours

  1. heavenali says:

    Well this is timely. Currently reading The World my Wilderness – my first Macaulay. She was very prolific.

    Like

    1. juliana says:

      Yes, now I am trying to find out which of these books are in print!

      Like

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