Shirley Jackson

Shirley Hardie Jackson (1916 – 1965) was an American author. Her work influenced authors such as Stephen King and Neil Gaiman. The Haunting of Hill House (1959) was nominated for the National Book Award in 1960.

She first attended the University of Rochester, before earning a BA degree from Syracuse University in 1940. While a student at Syracuse, Jackson became involved with the campus literary magazine, through which she met her future husband, Stanley Edgar Hyman, who would become a noted literary critic.

In 1965, Jackson died of heart failure in her sleep, at her home in North Bennington, at the age of 48.

“…I have always loved to use fear, to take it and comprehend it and make it work and consolidate a situation where I was afraid and take it whole and work from there…I delight in what I fear.” — from an unsent letter to poet Howard Nemerov by Shirley Jackson

Books

Novels

Memoirs

  • Life Among the Savages (1953)
  • Raising Demons (1957)

Story collections

  • The Lottery and Other Stories (Farrar, Straus, 1949)
  • The Magic of Shirley Jackson (Farrar, Straus, 1966)
  • Come Along with Me (Viking, 1968)
  • Just an Ordinary Day (Bantam, 1995)
  • Let Me Tell You (Random House, 2015)

Children’s works

  • The Witchcraft of Salem Village (1956)
  • The Bad Children (1959)
  • Nine Magic Wishes (1963)
  • Famous Sally (1966)

Awards and Honors

  • 1944 – Best American Short Stories 1944: “Come Dance with Me in Ireland”
  • 1949 – O. Henry Prize Stories 1949: “The Lottery”
  • 1951 – Best American Short Stories 1951: “The Summer People”
  • 1956 – Best American Short Stories 1956: “One Ordinary Day, with Peanuts”
  • 1959 – New York Times Book Review’s “Best Fiction of 1959” includes The Haunting of Hill House
  • 1960 – National Book Award nomination: The Haunting of Hill House
  • 1961 – Mystery Writers of America Edgar Allan Poe Award for Best Short Story: “Louisa, Please Come Home”
  • 1962 – Time magazine’s “Ten Best Novels” of the year includes We Have Always Lived in the Castle
  • 1964 – Best American Short Stories 1964: “Birthday Party”
  • 1966 – Mystery Writers of America Edgar Allan Poe Award for Best Short Story: “The Possibility of Evil”
  • 1966 – New York Times Book Review’s “Best Fiction of 1966” includes The Magic of Shirley Jackson
  • 1968 – New York Times Book Review’s “Best Fiction of 1968” includes Come Along with Me
  • 2007 – The Shirley Jackson Award is established for outstanding achievement in the literature of psychological suspense, horror, and the dark fantastic.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s